Community Festival, 01/07/2017 (Festival Review)

The first ever Community Festival, run by Festival Republic (the masterminds behind Reading and Leeds, Wireless, Download, Latitude and V-Festival), was held in Finsbury Park on July 1st 2017. The one day event was headlined by the brilliant Catfish and the Bottlemen and promised to showcase the best new music has to offer. The event consisted of two stages- The Main Stage and The N4 Stage- and saw 14 up and coming acts take to the stage. Community Festival, despite being a new festival, saw no teething problems and proved a roaring success amongst the hundreds of keen festival goers.

Here’s my pick of the day:

RedFaces kicked off the day with a raucous, yet exciting set. The day’s freshest faces played a captivating live set, with a sound and stage presence similar to that of The Libertines and Arctic Monkeys. The Sheffield band played a selection of new songs, including ‘Wise Up’ and ‘Kerosene’, and proved they’re ones to watch, earning their place on such a talented line-up.

Brighton band Fickle Friends took to the stage fresh from releasing their latest EP Glue. Momentum is just starting to build for the band and their set was full of radio hits and established indie anthems, including ‘Swim’ and ‘Cry Baby’. They consistantly write and release songs that you can’t help but want dance to, which are up-beat and infectiously catchy. The crowd were well and truly warmed up by the awe inspiring set.

Darlia are always fascinating. The Blackpool band played songs from their 2015 debut album, Petals, and impressed the audience with new songs, including ‘Ballard of Black and White’ and ‘Beam Me Up’. Their grungy sound is intriguing and also exciting.

You can’t deny that the The Hunna have done a lot over the last year. They’ve put out their debut record, 100, toured nationally and graduated from the BBC Introducing Stage into a world of main stages and chanting fans. Their Community Festival set seemed triumphant, with the crowd lapping up their every move. Granted, it may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but they did bring energy and enthusiasm to an already exciting line-up- what’s a festival without The Hunna these days anyway?

Nothing But Thieves are- debatably- no longer the new kids on the block. They’re established enough to have had hit after hit on their brilliant self-title debut album, including the singles ‘Trip Switch’, ‘Itch’ and ‘Wake Up Call’, and are set for success in releasing their up-coming second album. The band- with Conor Mason (lead singer)’s stunning, mature voice- played a huge set at the festival, with fans gathering in anticipation. They showcased new single ‘Amsterdam’, as well as other new songs.

If you haven’t seen Slaves live then you’re missing out. They’re extremely fascinating and tell the most brilliant anecdotes. The Kent punk duo played a mix of songs from their 2015 debut album Are You Satisfied?, as well as from their latest album Take Control (2016). They even brought out Madness’ Suggs to announce their guest appearance at Madness’s House of Common Festival, on Clapham Common, London.

I don’t think it’s fair to call The Wombats ‘new’ considering their debut album came out ten years ago. They’re one of the best live bands about and aren’t afraid to bring the stereotypically British party to any location. The band played songs spanning their impressive three album back catalogue. The huge crowd sang along word for word with the Liverpool trio and danced throughout the set and into the impromptu instrumental at the end (as they had a bit of time left). They definitely played one of the best sets of the day.

Catfish and the Bottlemen made a rare appearance headlining the new event.  They’ve remained pretty quiet since their sold out run of areas late last year, which saw them playing Wembley Arena, and are hopefully set to release new music soon. The band played hits from their first record- The Balcony– and a selection of tracks form their second record- The Ride. The indie-rock sensations brought a successful day to a close and proved what could happen with hard work and determination in just few years. It was the perfect end to a brilliant day and left the day with a euphoric, triumphant feel.

In conclusion, the first ever Community Festival was a success. I hope the event returns next year as there’s a lot of great new music that needs exposure and it proved such a success this year. The day was laced with the latest music, fan favourites and was a celebration of what can be achieved with drive and enthusiasm. The atmosphere was special too, with friendly fans and a real ‘community’ spirit (if you pardon the pun). I couldn’t recommend it more.

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Community Festival, 01/07/2017 (Festival Review)